Top 14 female hysteria treatment in 2022

Below are the best information and knowledge on the subject female hysteria treatment compiled and compiled by our own team alltopus:

1. The History of Hysteria and How it Impacts You

Author: en.wikipedia.org

Date Submitted: 06/17/2021 03:57 AM

Average star voting: 3 ⭐ ( 93928 reviews)

Summary:

Match with the search results: , in which good smells were placed under a woman’s genitals and bad odors at the nose, while sneezing could be also induced to drive the uterus back to its correct place….. read more

The History of Hysteria and How it Impacts You

2. The History Of “Female Hysteria” And The Sex Toys Used To Treat It

Author: embryo.asu.edu

Date Submitted: 10/22/2021 08:51 PM

Average star voting: 4 ⭐ ( 26937 reviews)

Summary: For centuries, doctors diagnosed women with a mental illness called female hysteria, of which the only cure was hysterical paroxysm – also known as an orgasm.

Match with the search results: According to Maines, women frequently left the douche treatment feeling extreme relief from hysteria and felt as if they had been drinking ……. read more

The History Of “Female Hysteria” And The Sex Toys Used To Treat It

3. Women And Hysteria In The History Of Mental Health

Author: www.medicalnewstoday.com

Date Submitted: 10/27/2020 11:37 PM

Average star voting: 3 ⭐ ( 99715 reviews)

Summary:

Match with the search results: Rest cure involved lots of bed rest and strict avoidance of all physical and intellectual activity. Mitchell prescribed this treatment ……. read more

Women And Hysteria In The History Of Mental Health

4. The History of Hysteria

Author: www.theatlantic.com

Date Submitted: 09/08/2020 11:48 AM

Average star voting: 4 ⭐ ( 55424 reviews)

Summary: Today, when we say someone is hysterical, we mean that they are frenzied, frantic, or out of control. Until 1980, however, hysteria was a formally studied psychological disorder that could be found in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Before its classification as a mental disorder, hysteria was considered a physical ailment, first described medically in 1880 by Jean-Martin Charcot. Even before this, hysteria was thoroughly described in ancient Egyptian and Greek societies. So what was hysteria? How did it just go away? Why was it a major point of contention for second wave feminists, and how was it treated? Throughout history hysteria has been a sex-selective disorder, affecting only those of us with a uterus. These uteri were often thought to be the basis of a variety of health problems. The ancient Egyptians and Greeks, for example, believed wombs capable of affecting the rest of the body’s health. In ancient Greece specifically, it was believed that a uterus could migrate around the female body, placing pressure on other organs and causing any number of ill effects. This “roaming uteri” theory, supported by works from the philosopher Plato and the physician Aeataeus, was called ‘hysterical suffocation’, and the offending uterus was usually coaxed back into place by placing good smells near the vagina, bad smells near the mouth, and sneezing. The philosopher and physician Galen however disagreed with the roving uterus theory, believing instead that the retention of ‘female seed’ within the womb was to blame for the anxiety, insomnia, depression, irritability, fainting and other symptoms women experienced. (Throughout these classical texts, pretty much any symptom could be attributed to the female sex organs, from fevers to kleptomania). Other writers and physicians at the time blamed the retention of menstrual blood for “female problems.” Either way, the obvious solution was to purge the offending fluid, so marriage (and its implied regular sexual intercourse) was the general recommendation. Male semen was also believed to have healing properties, so sex served two purposes. For young or unmarried women, widows, nuns or married women unable to achieve orgasm via the strictly penetrative heterosexual sex that was common at the time, midwives were occasionally employed to manually stimulate the genitals, and release the offending liquids. A 1637 text explains that when sexual fluids are not regularly released, ‘the heart and surrounding areas are enveloped in a morbid and moist exudation’, and that any ‘lascivious females, inclined to venery’ simply had a buildup of these fluids. It’s obviously laughable to think that doctors believed everything wrong with women could be attributed to their liquid levels, but contrarily it is interesting how close doctors got to the truth, in their belief that extreme sexual desire was caused by a lack of regular orgasm. It was Jean-Martin Charcot, in 1880 France, who first took a modern scientific sense to the female-only disease of hysteria. He lectured to his medical students, showing them photos and live subjects, on the hysteria symptoms he believed were caused by an unknown internal injury affecting the nervous system. One of these medical students was none other than Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis. Freud, working with his partner Breuer in Austria, developed Charcot’s theories further, and wrote several studies on female hysteria from 1880-1915. He believed that hysteria was a result, not of a physical injury in the body, but of a ‘psychological scar produced through trauma or repression’. Specifically, this psychological damage was a result of removing male sexuality from females, an idea that stems from Freud’s famous ‘Oedipal moment of recognition’ in which a young female realizes she has no penis, and has been castrated. (I don’t have the time to open that particular bag of worms, but feel free to click here to read about it) In essence, Freud believed that women experienced hysteria because they were unable to reconcile the loss of their (metaphoric) penis. With this in mind, Freud described hysteria as ‘characteristically feminine’, and recommended basically what every other man treating hysteria had through the years- get married and have sex. Previously this was done to allow for the ridding of sexual liquids, whereas now the idea was that a woman could regain her lost penis by marrying one, and potentially giving birth to one. If marriage wasn’t an acceptable or possible treatment however, there was another technique of treatment for hysteria, prolapsed uteri and any gynecologicals problem really, rising in popularity in the late 17th century- uterine massage. Yes, uterine or gynecologicals massage was exactly what you think it was. Invented by a Swedish Army Major named Thure Brandte, and though initially used to treat conditions in soldiers like prolapsed anuses, uterine massage quickly became the norm for treating everything in women from tilted uteri to nymphomania. Brandte opened several clinics, all of which were remarkably successful. He employed 5 med students, 10 female physical therapists, and had doctors from across the globe apprenticing at his clinics, which were known to treat as many as 117 patients in 1 day. Most recommended techniques were bimanual, meaning 1 hand was placed outside the body on the abdomen, and the other inserted into either the vagina or anus to perform massage, until a ‘paroxysmal convulsion’ (we now call these orgasms) was achieved. These sessions were considered ‘long and physically exhausting’ for doctors, for obvious reasons. This problem led to the creation of stimulation devices- namely, vibrators. (You can see some early vibrators by clicking here) At least officially, the sexual nature of these treatments was not realized, or at least acknowledged. While it’s hard to not see this procedure as a primarily sexual process when looking back, doctors at the time feared it becoming conflated with sex. So much so that some advocated hurting the female patients, or at least causing them discomfort. It still baffles me how any doctor could purposefully and unnecessarily hurt patients, but this is just another example of the many unethical medical processes women have been subject to. After about 1910, gynaecological massage fell into the category of alternative medicine, and while I’m sure you can still find someone practicing it today, advancements in medical knowledge (and feminist movements) have led to the understandings that the uterus is not at the heart of most medical problems, and that many of the symptoms previously attributed to hysteria truly belonged to mental illnesses, or were just normal, if unacceptable to historic societies, behaviours for females. Hysteria was basically the medical explanation for ‘everything that men found mysterious or unmanageable in women’, a conclusion only supported by men’s (historic and continuing) dominance over medicine, and hysteria’s continued use as a synonym for “over-emotional” or “deranged.” It’s also worth noting how many of the problems physicians were attempting to fix in female patients, were not problems when they presented in male patients. Gendered stereotypes, like the ideas that women should be submissive, even-tempered, and sexually inhibited, have caused tremendous damage throughout history (and continue to do so today). It doesn’t seem so coincidental then that most modern treatments for hysteria involved regular (marital) sex, marriage or pregnancy and childbirth, all ‘proper’ activities for a ‘proper’ woman. All things considered, most doctors and women alike were glad to see hysteria deleted from official Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders in 1980.

Match with the search results: There is scant evidence that orgasms were widely understood as a cure for female hysteria, and there’s even less evidence that Victorians ……. read more

The History of Hysteria

5. The Myth of Female Hysteria and Health Disparities among Women

Author: www.plannedparenthood.org

Date Submitted: 06/15/2019 11:49 AM

Average star voting: 4 ⭐ ( 69870 reviews)

Summary: For thousands of years, women’s health complaints were often diagnosed as “female hysteria” – a catch-all term that basically implied “it’s all in her head.” The condition was believed to be caused by a wandering uterus and/or sexual frustration. Doctors treated the condition using various regimens. Sometimes they would prescribe treatments with herbs and cold water. They also

Match with the search results: Over the years, treatment for this condition ranged from pelvic massage, forcing the woman to orgasm to release excess fluid, leeches on the ……. read more

The Myth of Female Hysteria and Health Disparities among Women

6. THE TREATMENT OF HYSTERIA

Author: allthatsinteresting.com

Date Submitted: 11/21/2019 02:25 AM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 20456 reviews)

Summary: The world war has provoked such an immense number of the various types of hysterical disorders that the conception of hysteria can now be studied more easily fr

Match with the search results: …. read more

THE TREATMENT OF HYSTERIA

7. The vibrator: from medical tool to revolutionary sex toy

Author: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Date Submitted: 03/07/2021 12:21 PM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 56179 reviews)

Summary: Many of us have heard the story that Victorian-era doctors first used vibrators, applying them to their female patients to treat them for hysteria. But it turns out this may be a myth.

Match with the search results: For centuries, doctors diagnosed women with a mental illness called female hysteria, of which the only cure was hysterical paroxysm – also ……. read more

The vibrator: from medical tool to revolutionary sex toy

8. The Lingering Effects of Female Hysteria in Medicine – Berkeley Political Review

Author: www.vintag.es

Date Submitted: 10/31/2019 11:55 AM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 32208 reviews)

Summary:

Match with the search results: Hysteria is considered a woman’s disease, and who more than women are prone to melancholy? This disease is the basis of female delirium: the woman feels ……. read more

The Lingering Effects of Female Hysteria in Medicine – Berkeley Political Review

9. Historical Treatments for Hysteria That Were Absolutely Bonkers

Author: www.glamour.com

Date Submitted: 12/14/2019 11:34 PM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 77501 reviews)

Summary: Some of these cures were definitely worse than the ailment.

Match with the search results: In the Victorian Era – specifically 1837 to 1901 – doctors treated woman by genital stimulation to induce “hysterical paroxysm” or an orgasm ……. read more

Historical Treatments for Hysteria That Were Absolutely Bonkers

10. Timeline: Female Hysteria and the Sex Toys Used to Treat It

Author: www.mcgill.ca

Date Submitted: 03/25/2020 09:18 PM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 83665 reviews)

Summary: Vibrators, douches, and pelvic massage: Curing crazy ladies for centuries—one “hysterical paroxysm” at a time.

Match with the search results: 3. When it came to treating hysteria, especially those who exhibited the “sexual symptoms” of the disorder, manual clitoral stimulation was used ……. read more

Timeline: Female Hysteria and the Sex Toys Used to Treat It

11. What is hysteria?

Author: www.rti.org

Date Submitted: 06/04/2020 04:40 AM

Average star voting: 4 ⭐ ( 63105 reviews)

Summary: Hysteria has long been associated with fanciful myths, but its history reveals how it has been used to control women’s behaviour and bodies

Match with the search results: , in which good smells were placed under a woman’s genitals and bad odors at the nose, while sneezing could be also induced to drive the uterus back to its correct place….. read more

What is hysteria?

12. Female Hysteria: 7 Crazy Things People Used To Believe About The Ladies’ Disease | HuffPost Communities

Author: www.youtube.com

Date Submitted: 07/15/2020 10:54 PM

Average star voting: 4 ⭐ ( 57061 reviews)

Summary:

Match with the search results: According to Maines, women frequently left the douche treatment feeling extreme relief from hysteria and felt as if they had been drinking ……. read more

Female Hysteria: 7 Crazy Things People Used To Believe About The Ladies' Disease | HuffPost Communities

13. Vibrators and hysteria: how a cure became a female sexual icon

Author: jamanetwork.com

Date Submitted: 09/08/2020 12:33 AM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 17730 reviews)

Summary: Vibrators have been causing a buzz for as long as they’ve existed: sometimes this happens behind closed doors, and sometimes in the public sphere. But as the new film Hysteria shows, there’s still fascination…

Match with the search results: Rest cure involved lots of bed rest and strict avoidance of all physical and intellectual activity. Mitchell prescribed this treatment ……. read more

Vibrators and hysteria: how a cure became a female sexual icon

14. Restoring Perspective: Life & Treatment at London’s Asylum

Author: www.bbc.com

Date Submitted: 09/11/2021 07:23 PM

Average star voting: 4 ⭐ ( 79936 reviews)

Summary:

Match with the search results: There is scant evidence that orgasms were widely understood as a cure for female hysteria, and there’s even less evidence that Victorians ……. read more

Restoring Perspective: Life & Treatment at London's Asylum

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