Top 7 cutis verticis gyrata treatment in 2022

Below are the best information and knowledge on the subject cutis verticis gyrata treatment compiled and compiled by our own team alltopus:

1. Cutis verticis gyrata | DermNet NZ

Author: dermnetnz.org

Date Submitted: 05/28/2020 07:52 PM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 21163 reviews)

Summary: Cutis verticis gyrata, Primary essential cutis verticis gyrata, Primary non-essential cutis verticis gyrata, Secondary cutis verticis gyrata. Authoritative facts from DermNet New Zealand.

Match with the search results: . Definitive treatment by surgery may be requested for cosmetic reasons. Small localised lesions can be excised in one procedure….. read more

Cutis verticis gyrata | DermNet NZ

2. A rare cutis verticis gyrata secondary to cerebriform intradermal nevus: case report and literature review – BMC Surgery

Author: bmcsurg.biomedcentral.com

Date Submitted: 12/25/2021 08:25 PM

Average star voting: 3 ⭐ ( 77119 reviews)

Summary: Cutis verticis gyrate (CVG) is a rare morphologic syndrome that presents with hypertrophy and folding of the scalp. CVG can be classified into three forms: primary essential, primary non-essential, and secondary. Cerebriform intradermal nevus (CIN) is a rare cause of secondary CVG. We are here to report a rare case of CVG with an underlying CIN and discuss the clinical course, treatment options, and critical screening guidelines for these patients. A 25 year-old male patient presented with a chief complaint of generalized hair loss in the scalp parietaloccipital region for a duration of 1 year and the hair loss area was occasionally accompanied by mild itching. The hair loss started gradually and worsened over time. In addition, he had scalp skin folds resembling the ridge and furrow of the cerebral cortex in the parietaloccipital region since birth. Physical examination revealed hypertrophy and formation of folds in the parietal-occipital area, forming 5 to 6 furrows and ridges. The size of the cerebriform mass was about 12.0 cm × 8.5 cm, without other skin lesions. Diffuse non-scarring hair loss was distributed on the posterior-parietal scalp, mid-parietal scalp and superior-occipital scalp. The diseased tissue of the patient’s parietaloccipital area was excised under general anesthesia. The postoperative pathological examination of the tissue excised showed that there were dense intradermal melanocytic nevus, so the patient was diagnosed with secondary CVG caused by CIN. At the 2 year follow-up, there were no obvious changes in the lesions. CIN must be differentiated from other conditions that manifest as CVG, including primary essential or non-essential CVG and secondary CVG caused by other reasons. Each CIN patient requires a specific decision of whether to excise the lesion surgically or follow a wait-and-see policy, depending on the patient’s will and specific condition. Surgical treatment may be performed when there is an aesthetic demand. However, clinical observation and close follow-up is also a good treatment choice for patients with stable disease or mild symptoms.

Match with the search results: However, surgical treatment, such as partial excision, staged excision, skin grafting, local flap grafting, free flap grafting and tissue ……. read more

A rare cutis verticis gyrata secondary to cerebriform intradermal nevus: case report and literature review - BMC Surgery

3. Cutis verticis gyrata

Author: jamanetwork.com

Date Submitted: 07/10/2019 12:25 PM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 66118 reviews)

Summary:

Match with the search results: A case of cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) occurred in a patient with no known associated disorders … Our patient was treated with a scalp reduction procedure….. read more

Cutis verticis gyrata

4. Cutis Verticis Gyrata Improved with Injected Hyaluronidase Treatments

Author: www.dermatologyadvisor.com

Date Submitted: 01/28/2020 07:21 PM

Average star voting: 3 ⭐ ( 25525 reviews)

Summary: Cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) is a condition of excessive skin growth on the scalp leading to deep furrows and folds that resemble the gyri of the brain. There are three main categories of CVG: primary essential, primary nonessential and secondary. Primary essential is idiopathic and presents only with cutaneous alterations. Primary nonessential has cutaneous findings that can be associated with neurological or opthalmoglical pathology.

Match with the search results: –Treat/manage underlying neurologic, ocular, cranial, and/or psychological disorders. –Consider excision/subcision by a plastic surgeon. Secondary cutis ……. read more

Cutis Verticis Gyrata Improved with Injected Hyaluronidase Treatments

5. Cutis Verticis Gyrata: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology

Author: scholars.direct

Date Submitted: 04/14/2019 08:07 AM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 75519 reviews)

Summary: Cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) is a descriptive term for a condition of the scalp manifesting as convoluted folds and furrows formed from thickened skin of the scalp resembling cerebriform pattern. Although Alibert first mentioned it, Robert described the condition in 1843.

Match with the search results: This patient was treated with six injections of 150 units of hyaluronidase every six weeks. After three weeks, the patient started to show ……. read more

Cutis Verticis Gyrata: Background, Pathophysiology, Etiology

6. Cutis Verticis Gyrata

Author: emedicine.medscape.com

Date Submitted: 09/24/2019 06:23 PM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 88046 reviews)

Summary: Cutis verticis gyrata (CVG), also known by the name paquidermia verticis gyrata, cutis verticis plicata, and “bulldog” scalp syndrome, is a rare benign cutaneous disorder that is characterized by convoluted folds and deep furrows of the scalp that mimic cerebral sulci and gyri.[1][2] It was initially reported in the medical literature in 1837 by Alibert.[2] In 1907, Unna devised the term ‘cutis verticis gyrata,’ which is the accepted nomenclature ever since.[3] In 1953, Butterworth classified CVG into two forms: primary and secondary.[4] In 1984, the classification system was further broken down into primary essential, primary non-essential, and secondary CVG. Primary non-essential cutis verticis gyrata can be associated with neuropsychiatric and ophthalmological abnormalities.  This form now has the name cutis verticis gyrata-intellectual disability (CVG-ID).[5][6] Secondary and primary non-essential cutis verticis gyrata have associated abnormalities, while primary essential CVG has no associations.[7][1]

Match with the search results: …. read more

Cutis Verticis Gyrata

7. A Rare Case of Cutis Verticis Gyrata with Underlying Cerebriform Intradermal Nevus

Author: emedicine.medscape.com

Date Submitted: 09/04/2019 02:55 PM

Average star voting: 3 ⭐ ( 80281 reviews)

Summary: Cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) is an uncommon condition of the scalp known for redundant, thickened folds, which emulate the cerebral gyri of the brain. This unusual finding is catalogued as primary essential, primary non-essential, and secondary. While primary essential CVG is an isolated and idiopathic condition, primary non-essential CVG is deemed to be related to neurological, ophthalmological, or psychiatric disorders. Secondary CVG may be due to a variety of systemic disorders, inflammatory dermatoses, or cutaneous neoplasms or infiltrates. This report serves as an example of secondary CVG due to a cerebriform intradermal nevus, with specific focus on clinical course, treatment options, and critical screening guidelines for these patients.

Match with the search results: In primary cutis verticis gyrata, surgical resection of the lesions is usually requested for psychological or esthetic reasons. … In cases of ……. read more

A Rare Case of Cutis Verticis Gyrata with Underlying Cerebriform Intradermal Nevus

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